E-Fest 2021: Electric Fields – Mari Kimura
Vancouver New Music presents

E-Fest 2021: Electric Fields – Mari Kimura

Virtual Event
From October 28th to November 10th 2021
For more information about this event, please contact Vancouver New Music at info@newmusic.org.

Buy Tickets

VIDEO ON DEMAND

After purchasing your ticket, a unique link will be sent to you by email and can be used to access the performance between October 28 at 12AM PST and November 10 at 11:45PM PST on one device at the time of your choosing. 

By donation - tickets available until November 10 at 8PM PST

...............

E-fest 2021: Electric Fields - gestural sonic expansions

MARI KIMURA (US/Japan)
Listen to the MUGIC®
(2021, 30 minutes)

Mari Kimura will present the history of her work for more than 10 years using a motion sensor in performance, which she started back in 2009 with the Sound Music Movement team at IRCAM. She just released her own motion sensor MUGIC® last year, which is now used by musicians, artists, dancers, actors around the world, and by universities such as Harvard, University of Toronto, Miami Bowling Green, Peabody Institute and Juilliard.

Mari Kimura is at the forefront of violinists who are extending the technical and expressive capabilities of the instrument. As a performer, composer,  researcher, and entrepreneur, she has opened up new sonic worlds and new musical possibilities for the violin. Notably, she has mastered the production of pitches that sound up to an octave below the violin’s lowest string without re-tuning. This technique, which she calls Subharmonics, has earned Mari considerable renown in the concert music world and beyond. She is also a pioneer in the field of interactive computer music. At the same time, she has earned international acclaim as a soloist and recitalist in both standard and contemporary repertoire. Her most recent efforts involve entrepreneurship, bringing her prototype motion sensor MUGIC™, (pronounced “mu” as in music +”gic” as in magic) to the market.

As a composer, Mari is a recipient of numerous awards and residencies including the Guggenheim Fellowship, Fromm Award from Harvard, residencies at the Rockefeller Brothers’ Fund and IRCAM in Paris. Mari’s commissions include the International Computer Music Association, Harvestworks, Music from Japan and others, supported by grants including New York Foundation for the Arts, Arts International, New Music USA/Meet The Composer, Japan Foundation, Argosy Foundation, and New York State Council on the Arts.  She was named one of 45 “Great Immigrants” by the Carnegie Corporation, and has been featured in major publications including the New York Times written by Matthew Gurewitsch, and in Scientific American written by Larry Greenemeier.

As a violinist, Mari has premiered many important works, including John Adams’s Violin Concerto (Japanese premiere), Luciano Berio’s Sequenza VIII (US premiere), Tania Léon’s Axon for violin and computer (world premiere), and Salvatore Sciarrino’s 6 Capricci (US premiere), among others. In 2007, Mari introduced Jean-Claude Risset’s violin concerto, Schemes, at Suntory Hall with the Tokyo Symphony Orchestra. The cadenza she wrote for the concerto, incorporating advanced Subharmonics, was subsequently published in STRINGS magazine.  In 2019, she gave the world premiere of Dai Fujikura’s “Motion Notions” for violin and a motion sensor at her solo recital at the International Chigiana Festival in Siena, Italy.

As an educator, Mari is the Founding Chair of the Future Music Lab at the Atlantic Music Festival in collaboration with IRCAM since 2013. The program focuses on high-level instrumental performers, who explore composition, improvisation and performance using the latest technology. Since 1998, Mari has been teaching a graduate course in Interactive Computer Music Performance at Juilliard. In 2017, Mari Kimura was named Professor of Music at UC Irvine’s “Integrated Composition, Improvisation and Technology” (ICIT) program, Music Department at the Claire Trevor School of the Arts.

As an entrepreneur, Mari is the President of Kimari, LLC creating MUGIC™.  In September 2020, after developing a new MUGIC™ prototype at Calit2 at UCI for two years, she released MUGIC™ commercially. MUGIC™ is now available at https://mugicmotion.com/ 

Mari studied the violin with Armand & Margaret Weisbord, Toshiya Eto, Roman Totenberg and Joseph Fuchs. She studied composition with Mario Davidovksy.

Photo credit: Librado Romero / The New York Times

...............

For 2021 we set aside our traditional festival format for one more year in favour of a virtual gathering. In the past couple of years most of us have had to navigate adaptations, modifications, extensions to how we engage and interact with others in the world. Many of us have also likely spent a fair amount of time thinking about our relationship to these tools and technological mediations, and how they shape or reshape familiar boundaries – for ourselves as individuals and in our relationships. 

From October 28 to November 10 we invite you to take in five new, on-demand performance video pieces from seven artists who play with unique intersections of body and technology, exploring and transforming the blurred boundaries that define autonomy and creative agency.

On November 6 at 2PM PST we invite you to join Artistic Director Giorgio Magnanensi for an online roundtable discussion with the festival artists. Please visit https://newmusic.org/electric-fields/ for more info.

Checking availabilities...

VIDEO ON DEMAND

After purchasing your ticket, a unique link will be sent to you by email and can be used to access the performance between October 28 at 12AM PST and November 10 at 11:45PM PST on one device at the time of your choosing. 

By donation - tickets available until November 10 at 8PM PST

...............

E-fest 2021: Electric Fields - gestural sonic expansions

MARI KIMURA (US/Japan)
Listen to the MUGIC®
(2021, 30 minutes)

Mari Kimura will present the history of her work for more than 10 years using a motion sensor in performance, which she started back in 2009 with the Sound Music Movement team at IRCAM. She just released her own motion sensor MUGIC® last year, which is now used by musicians, artists, dancers, actors around the world, and by universities such as Harvard, University of Toronto, Miami Bowling Green, Peabody Institute and Juilliard.

Mari Kimura is at the forefront of violinists who are extending the technical and expressive capabilities of the instrument. As a performer, composer,  researcher, and entrepreneur, she has opened up new sonic worlds and new musical possibilities for the violin. Notably, she has mastered the production of pitches that sound up to an octave below the violin’s lowest string without re-tuning. This technique, which she calls Subharmonics, has earned Mari considerable renown in the concert music world and beyond. She is also a pioneer in the field of interactive computer music. At the same time, she has earned international acclaim as a soloist and recitalist in both standard and contemporary repertoire. Her most recent efforts involve entrepreneurship, bringing her prototype motion sensor MUGIC™, (pronounced “mu” as in music +”gic” as in magic) to the market.

As a composer, Mari is a recipient of numerous awards and residencies including the Guggenheim Fellowship, Fromm Award from Harvard, residencies at the Rockefeller Brothers’ Fund and IRCAM in Paris. Mari’s commissions include the International Computer Music Association, Harvestworks, Music from Japan and others, supported by grants including New York Foundation for the Arts, Arts International, New Music USA/Meet The Composer, Japan Foundation, Argosy Foundation, and New York State Council on the Arts.  She was named one of 45 “Great Immigrants” by the Carnegie Corporation, and has been featured in major publications including the New York Times written by Matthew Gurewitsch, and in Scientific American written by Larry Greenemeier.

As a violinist, Mari has premiered many important works, including John Adams’s Violin Concerto (Japanese premiere), Luciano Berio’s Sequenza VIII (US premiere), Tania Léon’s Axon for violin and computer (world premiere), and Salvatore Sciarrino’s 6 Capricci (US premiere), among others. In 2007, Mari introduced Jean-Claude Risset’s violin concerto, Schemes, at Suntory Hall with the Tokyo Symphony Orchestra. The cadenza she wrote for the concerto, incorporating advanced Subharmonics, was subsequently published in STRINGS magazine.  In 2019, she gave the world premiere of Dai Fujikura’s “Motion Notions” for violin and a motion sensor at her solo recital at the International Chigiana Festival in Siena, Italy.

As an educator, Mari is the Founding Chair of the Future Music Lab at the Atlantic Music Festival in collaboration with IRCAM since 2013. The program focuses on high-level instrumental performers, who explore composition, improvisation and performance using the latest technology. Since 1998, Mari has been teaching a graduate course in Interactive Computer Music Performance at Juilliard. In 2017, Mari Kimura was named Professor of Music at UC Irvine’s “Integrated Composition, Improvisation and Technology” (ICIT) program, Music Department at the Claire Trevor School of the Arts.

As an entrepreneur, Mari is the President of Kimari, LLC creating MUGIC™.  In September 2020, after developing a new MUGIC™ prototype at Calit2 at UCI for two years, she released MUGIC™ commercially. MUGIC™ is now available at https://mugicmotion.com/ 

Mari studied the violin with Armand & Margaret Weisbord, Toshiya Eto, Roman Totenberg and Joseph Fuchs. She studied composition with Mario Davidovksy.

Photo credit: Librado Romero / The New York Times

...............

For 2021 we set aside our traditional festival format for one more year in favour of a virtual gathering. In the past couple of years most of us have had to navigate adaptations, modifications, extensions to how we engage and interact with others in the world. Many of us have also likely spent a fair amount of time thinking about our relationship to these tools and technological mediations, and how they shape or reshape familiar boundaries – for ourselves as individuals and in our relationships. 

From October 28 to November 10 we invite you to take in five new, on-demand performance video pieces from seven artists who play with unique intersections of body and technology, exploring and transforming the blurred boundaries that define autonomy and creative agency.

On November 6 at 2PM PST we invite you to join Artistic Director Giorgio Magnanensi for an online roundtable discussion with the festival artists. Please visit https://newmusic.org/electric-fields/ for more info.

Refunds
No refunds
Exchanges
No exchanges

Mari Kimura

Mari Kimura is at the forefront of violinists who are extending the technical and expressive capabilities of the instrument. As a performer, composer,  researcher, and entrepreneur, she has opened up new sonic worlds and new musical possibilities for the violin. Notably, she has mastered the production of pitches that sound up to an octave below the violin’s lowest string without re-tuning. This technique, which she calls Subharmonics, has earned Mari considerable renown in the concert music world and beyond. She is also a pioneer in the field of interactive computer music. At the same time, she has earned international acclaim as a soloist and recitalist in both standard and contemporary repertoire. Her most recent efforts involve entrepreneurship, bringing her prototype motion sensor MUGIC™, (pronounced “mu” as in music +”gic” as in magic) to the market.

As a composer, Mari is a recipient of numerous awards and residencies including the Guggenheim Fellowship, Fromm Award from Harvard, residencies at the Rockefeller Brothers’ Fund and IRCAM in Paris. Mari’s commissions include the International Computer Music Association, Harvestworks, Music from Japan and others, supported by grants including New York Foundation for the Arts, Arts International, New Music USA/Meet The Composer, Japan Foundation, Argosy Foundation, and New York State Council on the Arts.  She was named one of 45 “Great Immigrants” by the Carnegie Corporation, and has been featured in major publications including the New York Times written by Matthew Gurewitsch, and in Scientific American written by Larry Greenemeier.

As a violinist, Mari has premiered many important works, including John Adams’s Violin Concerto (Japanese premiere), Luciano Berio’s Sequenza VIII (US premiere), Tania Léon’s Axon for violin and computer (world premiere), and Salvatore Sciarrino’s 6 Capricci (US premiere), among others. In 2007, Mari introduced Jean-Claude Risset’s violin concerto, Schemes, at Suntory Hall with the Tokyo Symphony Orchestra. The cadenza she wrote for the concerto, incorporating advanced Subharmonics, was subsequently published in STRINGS magazine.  In 2019, she gave the world premiere of Dai Fujikura’s “Motion Notions” for violin and a motion sensor at her solo recital at the International Chigiana Festival in Siena, Italy.

As an educator, Mari is the Founding Chair of the Future Music Lab at the Atlantic Music Festival in collaboration with IRCAM since 2013. The program focuses on high-level instrumental performers, who explore composition, improvisation and performance using the latest technology. Since 1998, Mari has been teaching a graduate course in Interactive Computer Music Performance at Juilliard. In 2017, Mari Kimura was named Professor of Music at UC Irvine’s “Integrated Composition, Improvisation and Technology” (ICIT) program, Music Department at the Claire Trevor School of the Arts.

As an entrepreneur, Mari is the President of Kimari, LLC creating MUGIC™.  In September 2020, after developing a new MUGIC™ prototype at Calit2 at UCI for two years, she released MUGIC™ commercially. MUGIC™ is now available athttps://mugicmotion.com/ 

Mari studied the violin with Armand & Margaret Weisbord, Toshiya Eto, Roman Totenberg and Joseph Fuchs. She studied composition with Mario Davidovksy.

mugicmotion.com/