Gaming and History: Assassin’s Creed, as seen by historians
Pointe-à-Callière present

Gaming and History: Assassin’s Creed, as seen by historians

In-person Event
May 14th 2022
3:00 pm – 4:00 pm / Doors: 2:45 pm

165 place D'Youville, 165 place D'Youville, Montréal, QC, Canada
For more information about this event, please contact Pointe-à-Callière at communications@pacmusee.qc.ca.

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Illustration credit: Tony Zhu Shuo –  Assassin’s Creed® Valhalla – TM&Copyright © Ubisoft Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Only in French

DEVELOPING HISTORICAL THINKING THROUGH VIDEO GAMES

Can we trust the ways history is depicted in video games?

Can these platforms be useful, in a classroom setting or elsewhere, in developing the concepts of historical thinking?

While some believe that the more credible aspects of games threaten to undermine the player’s critical thinking, others see this as an opportunity to develop analytical sensibilities.

To address these questions, Marc-André Éthier of Université de Montréal and David Lefrançois of Université du Québec en Outaouais have spoken to a dozen historians who were consulted for the creation of certain episodes of the Ubisoft game Assassin’s Creed. Join our two guest speakers to find out what these specialists think about the link to history and its use in video games.

This lecture is presented as part of the Festival d’histoire de Montréal.

Speakers: Marc-André Éthier, Professor of Education Sciences at Université de Montréal, and David Lefrançois, Professor of Education Sciences at Université du Québec en Outaouais

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Illustration credit: Tony Zhu Shuo –  Assassin’s Creed® Valhalla – TM&Copyright © Ubisoft Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Only in French

DEVELOPING HISTORICAL THINKING THROUGH VIDEO GAMES

Can we trust the ways history is depicted in video games?

Can these platforms be useful, in a classroom setting or elsewhere, in developing the concepts of historical thinking?

While some believe that the more credible aspects of games threaten to undermine the player’s critical thinking, others see this as an opportunity to develop analytical sensibilities.

To address these questions, Marc-André Éthier of Université de Montréal and David Lefrançois of Université du Québec en Outaouais have spoken to a dozen historians who were consulted for the creation of certain episodes of the Ubisoft game Assassin’s Creed. Join our two guest speakers to find out what these specialists think about the link to history and its use in video games.

This lecture is presented as part of the Festival d’histoire de Montréal.

Speakers: Marc-André Éthier, Professor of Education Sciences at Université de Montréal, and David Lefrançois, Professor of Education Sciences at Université du Québec en Outaouais

Refunds
No refunds
Exchanges
No exchanges